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Hunter's Home

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This historic mansion, built in 1845 for Minerva Ross Murrell, wife of wealthy merchant, George M. Murrell, and niece of Cherokee Chief John Ross, stands as the only remaining antebellum mansion in Oklahoma. The Hunter's Home is operated by the Oklahoma Historical Society and has been designated a National Historic Landmark and certified Trail of Tears site. Plan a trip to this fascinating destination for tours, living history events and more.

When the home became a museum in the 1950s, Jennie Ross Cobb, a cousin of the Murrell sisters, was hired as curator and she was able to contact family members who inherited the Murrell furniture and other artifacts belonging to the family. It was in this way that many original Ross and Murrell furnishings were returned to the home.

The home's beautiful grounds include an original springhouse, an 1896 smokehouse, cabin and corncrib. The site is now operating as a 19th century living history farm where visitors may interact with period dressed interpreters as they care for the animals, gardens, crops, and mansion as well as demonstrate many 19th century crafts and trades. The living history season runs from Labor Day weekend to Memorial Day weekend.

A mid-nineteenth-century-style May Day Celebration is held annually on the first Saturday in May, featuring period living history demonstrations and highlighting the beginning of the growing season on the plantation.  

The Annual Antique Agriculture Festival is held the first weekend in October and celebrates the harvest with living history, food, entertainment, and more. Gift shop on site. Special arrangements can be made for group tours of 15 or more people, and living history programs for school groups are also available. 

The Hunter's Home, formerly known as the George M. Murrell Home, is also rumored to be haunted. Don't miss the home's annual Ghost Stories event and learn about the mysterious black dog that suddenly appeared along the local creek behind the home one night more than 150 years ago, the woman who appears in the home's attic window or the little girl who appears on the stairs.

Each December, the mansion is decorated for the holidays and staff open the doors to all comers for the annual Open House. At this time, staff utilize the historic smokehouse on site to smoke meats and cheeses while volunteers prepare delicacies from 19th century recipes. It is a wonderful and festive event for all ages. 

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